Wendy Johnson - RE/MAX Professional Associates



Posted by Wendy Johnson on 2/19/2020

Photo by David Mark via Pixabay

Picking the right veterinarian for your pets matters. It will put you at ease every time they need a healing touch. Whether you're new in town, or your pet has a specific issue you'd like carefully tended, here's how to find a vet who will offer you a high standard of care.

Finding the Best Vet in Town: Where to Start

You can start with a simple search: "veterinarian near me." Then, take a look at each website that comes up on the first page of search results. Check out the vets' biographies. Do they belong to the American Veterinary Medical Association? What about your state's or region's veterinary medical association? These are key credentials.

Now, talk with your neighbors who take a keen interest in their pets' well-being. They will be able to give you recommendations. Don't just ask your neighbor which office they use. Ask which of the practice's vets they couldn't do without!

Confirming What You Learn: Supplementing Your Pick With an Online Search

The two strategies above, combined, will start a solid, well-informed search.

Round your strategy out by going onto the online review sites (such as Yelp or Google), and confirm the opinion you have made.

Sure, some people use review sites to vent. But many clients use the sites to praise particular vets and their pets' experiences. And the negative reviews are likely to be answered in a polite, professional way by a good veterinary office.

Your Pet's First Visit: How You'll Know You've Found the Right Expert 

During your first appointment, consider all of these aspects good signs:

  • The place is clean. It looks busy, but not unmanageably hectic.
  • The office staff members are polite and understanding when answering calls.
  • Both the staff and the vet make you and your pet feel respected, and put you at ease. 
  • There is a caring protocol for pets' pain management. Neutering and spaying, for example, include pain relief medicine.

You'll want to know there are at least two vets on staff, to offer adequate coverage for absences. And the office should offer at least some weekend hours.

Changing Course: When the Time Comes to Switch Vet Practices

Do not be embarrassed about switching to a new vet if you develop concerns about your current practice. You might also just wish to go with another, highly recommended vet.

But do collect all the necessary information before you switch. Ask for full records pertaining to your pet. These might be handed to you on a disk, or sent directly to your new vet.

Best wishes settling in with the perfect vet to oversee the health of your best buddies for life.




Tags: moving   Veterinarian   Local Vet  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Wendy Johnson on 2/12/2020

Photo by Robert Arthur Designs via Shutterstock

If you’re moving to a new city, particularly an area with new development, you may discover that most homes are part of a homeowner’s association. If you’ve never been part of one before, you might not understand their function and why they are useful within a neighborhood.

When an association functions properly, it improves the value of homes in the community. The rules and conditions keep your neighbors from infringing on your rights and vice versa.

Here’s a brief list of how your HOA benefits you:

  • It handles disputes between neighbors, so if your neighbor’s tree falls on your fence, the association mediates getting your fence repaired. Rules regarding approval for changes, renovations or upgrades to exteriors keep your neighbor from adding a second story that blocks your lake view or changing their exterior to a particularly obnoxious shade of orange.
  • It gives access to and maintains shared or common property. Typically, playgrounds, pools and parks fall into this category. In the case of condominiums and patio homes, the HOA often handles repairs to the exterior, roofs, elevators, garage doors and fences. Entry doors, hallways, and security also often fall under the jurisdiction of the association.
  • Many HOAs hire a property management service to take care of entry gates for a gated community, make agreements for waste removal and negotiate with the city regarding rezoning that might affect your home.
  • In some cases, HOAs handle the landscaping on the front of your home so that you only take care of your enclosed back yard or patio. For busy homeowners, this is quite an advantage. Other associations merely govern how long you can let your grass grow. This protects you from a negligent property owner that doesn’t take care of the house down the street.

While some of the rules may seem onerous, quizzing longtime residents can give insight into why one or another was added. A rule about basketball hoops in the driveway might make it seem as if they don’t want your kids playing out front. But perhaps the rule resulted from a freak windstorm that sent a freestanding basketball hoop across the street and through a neighbor’s window. Unless you ask, you don’t know.

Take time to attend your HOA meetings and become involved in the community. Even run for office and make your voice heard. If you have questions about living in an HOA community, your professional real estate agent can answer them.




Tags: hoa   buying  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Wendy Johnson on 2/5/2020

With 24 hours before you finalize your home purchase, you might feel a mix of anxiety and excitement.

What will it be like to finally own a home? How will the home closing process go? And what will I need to do to ensure everything goes seamlessly as you wrap up your home purchase? These are just some of the common questions that homebuyers consider in the hours leading up to a home closing.

It is important to prepare as much as possible before you complete a home purchase. Lucky for you, we're here to help you do just that.

Let's take a look at three tips that you can use to get ready to finish a home purchase.

1. Get Your Paperwork in Order

You may need multiple forms of identification and other essential documents when you close on a home. Thus, you should put together a folder of any must-have documents at least a day in advance.

If you find that documents are missing, retrieve them as quickly as possible. Also, try to get multiple copies of important documents if you can.

When it comes to getting ready for a home closing, it usually is better to over-prepare. Therefore, if you plan ahead as much as you can, you'll have all of the documents you need to complete the home closing process without delay.

2. Finish Any Last-Minute Packing

After you finalize a home purchase, you'll be ready to move in to your new home. As such, you should ensure that all of your belongings are packed up and ready to go.

If you're vacating an apartment, ensure that you've notified your landlord and provided sufficient notice about your upcoming move. That way, you'll be able to finish your rental agreement on good terms with your landlord.

Also, if you need extra help for your move, be sure to reach out to a moving company or family members and friends. And if you require a moving truck, don't forget to rent one in the days leading up to your move.

3. Consult with Your Real Estate Agent

The day before a home closing can be stressful, particularly for first-time homebuyers. If you have any concerns about the home closing process, be sure to consult with your real estate agent.

Your real estate agent likely has been a life-saver throughout the homebuying process thus far and will continue to assist you in any way possible. If you have questions about the home closing cycle, your real estate agent will respond to your queries immediately.

In addition, your real estate agent can teach you the ins and outs about what will happen before, during and after a home closing. He or she will explain what to look for during a final home walk-through, what home closing forms that you'll need to sign and what to expect after a home purchase.

Streamline the home closing process – use these tips, and you can get take the guesswork out of finalizing a home purchase.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Wendy Johnson on 1/29/2020

Everyone is looking for something different when it comes to finding the ideal home. While some people prioritize architectural styles and curb appeal, other house hunters place the most value on the quality of the school district and proximity to jobs.

Neighborhood quality is also a significant factor in house-buying decisions. What exactly does "neighborhood quality" mean, though? Although definitions may vary, the characteristics that are typically considered to be desirable include a low crime rate, relatively light street traffic, a minimal amount of "noise pollution," and neighborhoods in which houses and properties are consistently well cared for and in good condition.

If peace, quiet, and tranquility are high on your list of house-buying requirements, here are a few other items you might consider adding to your "wish list."

Space between neighbors: While it's generally a good thing to get to know your neighbors on a first-name basis, you don't necessarily want to get to know them too well -- or vise versa! In other words, it's nice when you can sit out on your back porch without having to be too concerned about being overheard or needing to edit your conversations. If privacy is a top priority for you, then you might want to limit your search to properties that provide a comfortable buffer zone between houses.

Greenery and privacy hedges: A residential street with green, well-tended lawns and mature, leafy trees is not only visually appealing, but it's also a sign that people take pride in their property and care about the neighborhood. Homes for sale that offer a "park-like setting" on a nice street can be the ideal environment for creating a private, backyard refuge.

Fireplaces: Even if a fireplace is not on your "must have" list, it's a relatively inexpensive luxury to have and enjoy during the holidays and when the temperature drops. Regardless of the climate in which you live, there are going to be plenty of wet, cloudy, or snowy days during the winter months. When the weather turns chilly, there's nothing like a crackling fire in the fireplace to infuse your home with a cozy, relaxing atmosphere!

Large windows: Large bay windows, picture windows, and floor-to-ceiling windows not only let in a lot of natural light, but they also help you enjoy views of your neighborhood and backyard. That combination of sunshine, green foliage, a well-landscaped property, and the smell of freshly cut grass can set the tone for a relaxing home environment -- both indoors and out! Along those same lines, a sunroom can also be a highly desirable feature in a new home you're considering buying.

Although there are a ton of things you can do to enhance the beauty and relaxation value of your next home, the starting point is to find a peaceful neighborhood and a spacious, nicely landscaped property on which to add your own personal touches.





Posted by Wendy Johnson on 1/22/2020

A home bar is one thing that most adults should have in their homes. Even if you’re not a drinker yourself, you should have something on hand to offer guests when they come over for an evening of food and conversation. You’ll need the right setup, the right tools, and the right recipes handy to have the perfect home bar. Whether you have a bar already or are looking to build your own, we have all the tips that you’ll need as a rookie bartender.  


The Essentials


You’ll need quite a few essentials in your home bar including but not limited to:


  • Glasses
  • Bitters
  • Bar tools
  • Recipe books
  • Spirits
  • Mixers
  • Garnishes

Find The Right Surface To Transform Into A Bar


You can easily transform any table, sideboard, or cart into a bar. If the vessel that you’re using has a drawer, that’s even better. You can keep all of your bottles, glasses, decanters, and openers in one convenient place. It’s not bad if you can’t fit all of your supplies in one place. Less used items can be stored in the pantry. 


You can even use a simple bookshelf to store all of your bar supplies. Transform any bookcase from “boring bookshelf” to home bar in no time. You can arrange the shelving by category, giving each shelf a purpose. You can keep spirits on one shelf, glasses on another shelf, tools on another, and recipe books on another shelf. 


Does Your Home Have An Actual Bar Built-In?


Many homes actually have bars built in, but people rarely use them because they feel inexperienced in using the bar tools of the trade. Whether you have a full wet bar or a simpler dry bar, keep all of the essentials there. You’ll need:


  • Bar towel
  • Trash can
  •  Glasses
  • Decanter
  • Bar spoon
  • Strainer
  • Shaker
  • Access to ice
  • Juice
  • Sodas
  • Juicer
  • Limes
  • Lemons
  • Jigger
  • Simple Syrup
  • Old fashioned glass
  • Peeler
  • Mesh strainer

Location Of The Bar


If you’re setting up a brand new bar, there’s a variety of places that you can put the bar. If you have space in the kitchen, you can add it to a corner right there. Other great places for your bar could be a den or a man cave. Wherever you’ll spend time hanging out with company is a good place to keep your bar. If you have children, you might even consider getting a locking cabinet system for your liquor. You don’t want little hands getting into what they’re not supposed to.  


Setting up your own home bar is something to be proud of. It will be quite the conversation piece when guests come over. You’ll be able to discuss your collection of liquors and see if friends have any recommendations as to what you might add to your selection of liquors. A home bar is an entertaining essential.